Formula One grid girl hits back at calls for the promotional role to be scrapped

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Jake Bourke

Grid girl Aneeka Simonis, far right, told Neil Mitchell she didn't feel objectified.

Grid girl Aneeka Simonis, far right, told Neil Mitchell she didn't feel objectified.

A grid girl has hit back at suggestions her role demeans women and says she wouldn't do it if that was the case.

There have been calls from women's groups to scrap the promotional role in the lead up to this weekend's Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park.

Tanya Kovac is a National Co-Convenor of Emily's List, a national network that promotes progressive politics, and told Neil Mitchell the job was "decorative" and "demeaning" for women.

"They're limiting the talents of women," she said.

LISTEN: Has the role of a Formula One grid girl run its race?

Ms Kovac said she wouldn't take her family to this weekend's Grand Prix because she felt the event wasn't inclusive.

She said it was only pitched at businessmen and corporates.

"I wouldn't take my kids to that because I just assume that it's a very 'male' sport," she said.

"They're using a heterosexualised sex gaze, which is mostly directed to men, to be able to appeal to a particular market.

"I don't feel included in that."

But Melbourne journalist Aneeka Simonis hit back on 3AW Mornings, telling Neil Mitchell she had been a grid girl for the past four years and that it was anything but demeaning.

"I really object to that idea that we are demeaning ourselves, or acting in a manner that doesn't really respect ourselves," she said.

"If you have one look at our outfit you'll see it's almost down to our knees.

"We look very respectable and we are there in a professional capacity.

"It's not something that I and the girls that I work with would take part in if we were objectifying ourselves."

LISTEN: Grid Girl Aneeka Simonis rejects suggestions the role is demeaning

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