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A million Victorians could be caught out by ‘hidden trap’ in QR code rules

Neil Mitchell
Article image for A million Victorians could be caught out by ‘hidden trap’ in QR code rules

A bizarre inclusion in Victoria’s QR code rules has left at least one pensioner $180 out of pocket, and it could see up to a million Victorians caught out.

Under the restrictions, units, flats, townhouses and residential apartment buildings appear to be required to have QR codes for visitors, even if the only shared space on the property is a driveway.

Some body corporates have already charged residents fees to introduce QR codes on their properties.

Karen Egan says her elderly mother has been whacked $180 by her body corporate for a QR system at her freestanding townhouse.

“She’s been sent a bill from the body corporate,” she told Neil Mitchell.

“It’s a freestanding town house, one of four!

“The only communal area they have is a drive way.

“It’s a joke.”

Those who don’t have a code displayed, or have guests who don’t check in, could theoretically face fines of up to $1652 under the Victorian government’s QR code rules.

Neil Mitchell says the rule is a “hidden trap” and up to a million Victorians could be affected.

“I think it’s unworkable,” he said.

Press PLAY below for details on the hidden trap

National Franchise Manager for MCMB Strata Specialists, Richard Reid, says the advice provided to body corporates is “conflicting”.

“Our advice is that any owners corporation must have one, and that’s for anybody visiting the common property,” he told Neil Mitchell.

“The advice is conflicting, we’re not certain about it, but if the regulations say that we take a very conservative approach because we don’t want our owners corporations being fined.”

Press PLAY below to hear more on how owners corporations are dealing with the confusing situation

Image: Naomi Rahim / Getty

 

 

Neil Mitchell
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