Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Bill Shorten reveals 20 year political ambition as Labor review finds he was key to the election loss

Labor lost the federal election because of three factors — weak strategy, poor adaptability, and Bill Shorten — according to a party review.

But just ahead of the review’s release yesterday, former party leader Bill Shorten put out his own media release, revealing his intention to remain in politics for another 20 years.

3AW’s Neil Mitchell says it’s time for the former leader to go.

“If Anthony Albanese has got a to-do list, top of the list should be to get rid of Bill,” the 3AW Mornings host said.

“See, Bill still doesn’t get it. He blew the last election with arrogance, with this absurd confection of a character, fake Bill.

“He blew it with what amounted to class warfare, but he now says he’s staying around another 20 years in parliament.

“And the seasoned and well-respected commentators in Canberra say he wants the leadership back!”

But Deputy Labor Leader Richard Marles said the findings of the review into the election loss does not mean Mr Shorten doesn’t need to be booted from the party.

“The situation at the last election was complex, but of all the findings that were made those in relation to Bill are, in a sense, the least relevant,” he told Neil Mitchell.

“It’s the least relevant set of conclusions in terms of lessons that we draw going forward, because he’s not the leader.”

Mr Marles denied rumours that Mr Shorten is seeking to regain party leadership.

“Bill is on the front bench, he’s doing a good job there, he’s made it clear he’s not interested in the leadership,” he said.

The party is focused on clearer messaging and a focus on the economy, going forward.

“I think the raft of policies that we had in the tax and the economic space meant that people did not feel that we were a safe pair of hands when it came to the economy,” Mr Marles said.

“I don’t think you can win an election unless you gain a licence from the Australian people to manage the Australian economy, and that’s what we now need to seek.”

Press PLAY below for more.

Image: Scott Barbour / Stringer

Advertisement