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Bob Hart’s recipe for Korean-style buffalo wings

KIM JONG WINGS

Americans have decided two things that are having an increasing effect on our lives. The first is that chicken wings are the ultimate footy food. And the second is that Korean is the hottest new food trend – literally. Australians are warming, literally, to both.

The chicken wing craze began with buffalo wings – chicken flats and drummies which are deep fried and served with a blue cheese dip. Nobody in the US watches an NFL game on the telly without a tray of these and 20 beers. But then, they have no idea what a Four ‘N’ Twenty is, do they?

The cool (but spicy) new version of buffalo wings, however, is a variation I call Kim Il Wings: they are Korean, and are a great way to get to know a really important new flavour sensation, the greatest thing to have come along since chipotle.

It’s a Korean chilli paste called Gochujang, and you can pick up a pot of it in any Asian market. Which I strongly suggest you do immediately. And then, try this dish – while watching footy on the telly, of course. Even if it’s re-plays and classic games.

Pick up a dozen whole chicken wings, salt them and refrigerate them overnight. Then, make your amazing Korean glaze.

In a large bowl, mix ¼ cup soy sauce, ¼ cup Korean chilli paste (Gochujang), 2 tbs rice vinegar, 2tbs honey, 1tbs roasted sesame oil, 1tbs pressed garlic and 1tbs ginger, also pressed. Mix very well and put aside.

Return the wings to room temperature (I use whole wings, but if you can more easily obtain buffalo wings, they work fine) and cost them lightly in EV olive oil. Then, grill them (200C) for about 15 minutes – covered, or course, but lifting the lid occasionally to move them around on the grill until they are getting golden and grill-marked.

Now, drop them, straight from the grill, into the glaze. Toss them well, lift them out onto a platter and sprinkle with sesame seeds, and then return them to the hot grill for just a few minutes, turning them, until they are glazed and golden. And that’s it.

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