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COVID-19 FAQ: Your coronavirus questions answered

As the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic ramps up in Australia, the 3AW Breakfast team have been swamped with questions about the virus.

Luckily, Dean of Health at Swinburne University, Professor Bruce Thompson, has answered all of your most pressing questions!

Q: Once you’ve had it, can you get it again?

“Very unlikely,” Professor Thompson said.

Q: Is it okay to take domestic flights?

“That’s a tricky one. We’re obviously trying to keep isolation, so they more you’re exposed to the people in airports and what have you the more likely you might actually get this virus,” Professor Thompson said.

“We also just don’t want it to be transmitted.

“Unless it’s really, really necessary I wouldn’t do it.”

Q: Why is COVID-19 not particularly affecting pregnant women or kids?

“Kids and pregnant women have a pretty robust immune system, especially kids,” Professor Thompson said.

“As we get older, like everything, it doesn’t quite work as well.”

Q: Is there any point wearing a mask?

“The mask is only good to prevent you from someone who has it that you’re working directly with, or if you have it yourself and are potentially transmitting it to other people,” Professor Thompson said.

“The issue is we don’t really have enough masks. The hospitals really, really need them.”

Q: Is it okay to stay with elderly relatives?

If you have no symptoms at all and that’s been the case for over the week, it’s okay, especially if your elderly relatives are healthy.

Q: Canada has announced it’s closing its borders, should we?

“I would highly consider it,” Professor Thompson said.

“If we stop the increase in the actual virus and contain it then why would you actually have people who may bring more virus in?”

Q: How long can the virus exist outside the human body?

“Sitting on a surface it lasts for a few hours, so that’s a reasonable amount of time, Professor Thompson said.

“It’s easy to get rid of just by wiping it, just with a standard cleansing wipe.”

Q: Are teachers at greater risk?

“They’re more exposed to a greater proportion of the population,” Professor Thompson said.

“The kids are probably not as good at hand hygiene and coughing into their elbows.”

Press PLAY below for more.

Image: SOPA Images

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