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Lynette’s law: Husband of Eastern Freeway victim pushes for new law to honour his wife

Neil Mitchell
Article image for Lynette’s law: Husband of Eastern Freeway victim pushes for new law to honour his wife

The husband of a police officer who was filmed and taunted as she lay dying after being struck by a truck on the Eastern Freeway is campaigning for a new law to make it easier charge people who film depraved acts and post them online.

Lynette Taylor was one of four officers killed when a truck ploughed into them last April.

Porsche driver Richard Pusey, who had been pulled over by the police before the truck crashed into them, filmed Senior Constable Taylor and taunted her as she lay dying.

While Pusey did not upload the footage on social media himself, he showed it to a doctor and two chemist staff shortly after the collision.

He was convicted with outraging public decency and was sentenced to three months behind bars, which was later reduced to two.

The slain police officer’s husband, Stuart Schulze says he was “angry and disappointed” with the short sentence.

“That hurt,” he told Neil Mitchell.

Mr Schulze, a former police officer himself, has today launched a campaign to change legislation to make it easier to charge people who film depraved acts and put them online.

He is lobbying to create a law of outraging public decency under the Crimes Act with a punishment of up to 10 years’ jail.

PRESS HERE TO SIGN MR SCHULZE’S PETITION.

He says the law hasn’t kept up with changing technology, and while Pusey cannot be re-sentenced, he wants it to be easier for future perpetrators of similar despicable behaviour to be charged appropriately.

“I want the government to enact legislation to cover this type of offending,” Mr Schulze said.

“We have a modern system where mobile phones and commentary with two clicks can be uploaded to anything and everyone without filtering and without recourse and there’s no control over it.

“There’s no accountability for what they do.

“We need a moral responsibility to control these things.”

Press PLAY below to hear Mr Schulze passionate push to change our laws

Neil Mitchell
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