Thanks for logging in.

You can now click/tap WATCH to start the live stream.

Thanks for logging in.

You can now click/tap LISTEN to start the live stream.

Thanks for logging in.

You can now click/tap LATEST NEWS to start the live stream.

LISTEN
Watch
on air now

Create a 3AW account today!

You can now log in once to listen live, watch live, join competitions, enjoy exclusive 3AW content and other benefits.


Joining is easy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

‘Shock’ and ‘anger’ as plot holders suddenly barred from Collingwood community garden

Neil Mitchell
Article image for ‘Shock’ and ‘anger’ as plot holders suddenly barred from Collingwood community garden

Access to a 42-year-old Melbourne community garden has been abruptly stopped, after a report found snakes and star pickets posed unacceptable safety risks.

More than 1000 people have been locked out of 70 allotments at the community garden in Collingwood Children’s Farm indefinitely.

It comes after a report from an external consultant which identified serious safety issues.

City of Yarra Councillor Stephen Jolly said it’s “a bit over the top”.

“If we had this type of approach to the building industry we wouldn’t have a building industry,” he told Neil Mitchell.

“It’s easily fixed.”

Councillor Jolly said the plot holders are “were shocked at first and now they’re just plain angry”.

He says there are concerns that the farm wants the community garden gone for good.

But Collingwood Children’s Farm general manager Conor Hickey says the closure is temporary.

“I understand this has saddened a lot of people and it was sudden, but we have every intention of reopening, we have every intention of making that space safe, accessible and inclusive,” she told Neil Mitchell.

She says snakes are sighted “on a regular basis” in the area, and overgrown plots are havens for the reptiles.

“There was somebody bitten this summer right beside the community garden,” she said.

Press PLAY below to hear more on the sudden closure of the community garden to plot holders

Neil Mitchell
Advertisement