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SOUL DANCERS: An interview with Spear producer John Harvey

Article image for SOUL DANCERS: An interview with Spear producer John Harvey

SOUL DANCERS: An interview with Spear producer John Harvey

The sense of cultural dislocation felt by many indigenous Australians is the driving theme of Spear, the first film from the world-renown Bangarra Dance Theatre. Judging from what appears on screen, it is easy to argue that has taken far too long.

Directed by the troupe’s artistic director Stephen Page, the film is framed by the idea of having ‘a foot in each world, a heart in none’ as a young indigenous man embarks on a spiritual journey through his conflicted world.

Hunter Page-Lochard in Spear.

Hunter Page-Lochard in Spear.

Through a series of impressive dance numbers, many filmed on location, he witnesses a host of unsettling visions as the beauty of his culture clashes with the harsh, corrosive realities of urban life.

Stephen Page’s other chief film credit is as director of Sand, a segment the epic 2013 art film The Turning by producer Robert Connolly, who served as executive producer on Spear.

Here producer John Harvey discusses the making of the film, its themes and philosophy.

He explains the meaning behind the bizarre sequence where indigenous dancers perform to the tune of the racist 1960s novelty song My Boomerang Won’t Come Back and explores why indigenous films are no longer box-office poison.

Spear is now screening at the Nova.

 

Watch the John Harvey interview here:

 

Watch the trailer for Spear here:

 

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