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The ‘real problem’ Neil Mitchell thinks could keep Victoria in lockdown

Article image for The ‘real problem’ Neil Mitchell thinks could keep Victoria in lockdown

The number of Victorians being tested for COVID-19 has fallen sharply and Neil Mitchell thinks Victorians will be kept in lockdown for longer than they need to be, if testing rates don’t pick up.

In the past week, the number of people presenting for testing has fallen by 31 per cent.

Press PLAY below for Neil Mitchell’s thoughts on the testing decline.

In July, there were an average of almost 26,000 people being tested per day.

In the seven days to yesterday, the average per day was 19,000.

Neil Mitchell says it’s a “real problem”.

“Something is wrong. Have too many drive throughs closed? Is the isolation rule a problem? Is it a stigma, being positive?,” the 3AW Mornings host questioned.

“It is not over yet and until we get reliable and decent, regular numbers they’re going to be very reluctant to start easing restrictions too much because they’ll say ‘Hang on, we don’t really know how much us out in the community’.”

Melbourne GP, Dr Mukesh Haikerwal says the hard lockdown and curfew will have led to a reduction in illness in the community, but not to the degree that testing rates suggest.

He thinks there are several reasons why testing rates have dropped off.

“I think people are essentially a bit complacent,” he told Neil Mitchell.

“I think people don’t understand the need to get tested. I think they’re scared about getting tested because they think ‘Well, if I get tested I have to isolate’.

“There is a stigma … You shouldn’t be blamed for illness, you should be supported.”

 

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