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It’s ‘science not opinion’: Researchers aim to ‘increase climate literacy’ through Jane Bunn

Article image for It’s ‘science not opinion’: Researchers aim to ‘increase climate literacy’ through Jane Bunn

The founder of the climate change hub which provides information and graphics to TV weather presenters says their aim is not to push a climate change message but simply to present factual climate information.

It comes after The Age revealed yesterday 7 meterologist Jane Bunn has using information from the Climate Change Communication Research Hub at Monash University to promote climate change awareness in the community.

Research hub founder Dr. David Holmes told Neil Mitchell Bunn and the ABC’s Paul Higgins are not presenting a “subliminal message” because it’s just factual information.

“I wouldn’t say it’s subliminal in the sense that what is being presented is factual information from climate scientists,” Dr Holmes said.

“It’s showing trends that go back 50 years, there is a difference between climate and weather, climate is about long term trends.

“It’s information that’s presented by trusted communicators.

“It’s not arguing any case, it’s factual information and audiences can take from it what they will.

“The information we broker turns on science not opinion.

“(The aim is) to increase climate literacy.”

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Dr Holmes told Neil his group is meeting with Nine News about its weather presenters and whether they would want to use the supplied information.

“Good luck to them, and Channel 7 – but I don’t want to see it happening here,” Neil Mitchell said.

“I think it’s blurring, not necessarily crossing, blurring a line.”

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